WFC Jordan: كابتن أبو رائد

Eek! The DVD version I bought is dubbed into German. I should start paying more attention when buying films…

But! Amazon to the rescue. I downloaded a version in Arabic with English subtitles from Amazon (via my Ipod Touch). Phew!

This is a very odd film structurally. It starts off slowly and the characters’ story lines interact in the ways you would guess they would have in, like, a comedy from the 1940s.

And then, half way through, it changes into something else completely. The changeover from comedy to child abuse drama is a bit… “waaat? Hm.”

It won a bunch of awards.

Captain Abu Raed. Amin Matalqa. 2008. Jordan.

Middle Eastern Mint Lemonade

  • 3 parts simple syrup
  • 3 parts lemon juice
  • 2 parts mint leaves
  • 3 parts Limoncello

Muddle the mint with the syrup. Add the lemon juice and the Limoncello and shake with ice. Double strain into an ice-filled glass.

OK, adding the Limoncello was my idea, but it’s delish. I just couldn’t find any Jordanian cocktail recipes. I blame bad Interwebs in Jordan.

This post is part of the World of Films and Cocktails series. Explore the map.

WFC Somalia: Fishing Without Nets

It’s kinda interesting visually, but the constant shakycam is unpleasant to watch. The actors vary wildly: Some seem are pretty convincing but most are very stiff. (I’m assuming they’re non-professionals.)

It’s not a bad film or anything, but it uses so many parts of The Hollywood How-To Book On Drama/Action Film-Making (scoring, editing, etc) that it just gets distracting. “Yes, now there’s that dun-duum sound… Yes, now he’s trying to get her on the phone while staring out onto the sea…”

Too many basic movie-making clichés that distracts from what is, otherwise, a pretty good film. I guess that’s what I’m saying.

But I can totally see why it would win an award at Sundance.

[time passes]

OK, I wrote all that at the mid-way point when I went to make the cocktail. I mean tea. Either it’s the cocktail or it’s the film, but I was totally riveted the last half of this movie. Even the performances seems to get a lot better! (That’s probably the tea talking.)

So exciting and nerve-wracking.

This might be the er tea talking:

Hey! That was supposed to be a five! Well, I’m not re-shooting that picture… I gotta make dinner…

Fishing Without Nets. Cutter Hodierne. 2014. Somalia.

Shaah Adays: Somali spiced tea with milk

  • 5 cloves
  • 2 cinnamon sticks, broken in half
  • 4 whole black pepper
  • 10 cardamom pods
  • 4 tea bags or two tablespoons loose black tea
  • 2 cups of water
  • 2 cups of milk
  • sugar to taste
  • rum to taste

Lightly crush all the spices in a mortar. Combine everything (except tea and rum) in a sauce pan and bring up to a boil. Add the tea and steep on low heat for five minutes. Add rum and double strain into a cup.

This post is part of the World of Films and Cocktails series. Explore the map.

WFC Lebanon: سكر بنات

Very sassy. A classic Mediterranean feel good comedy.

I guess I could be very critical of some bits (like the occasional shakycam and generally not very interesting cinematography), but the actors are so good and it’s all so touching and charming. So on charm alone:

Caramel. Nadine Labaki. 2007. Lebanon.

Jad Ballout’s Garcia’s Fattoush Cup

  • 1 part cucumber syrup
  • 1 part extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 parts simple syrup
  • 2 parts lemon juice
  • 7 parts lemon vodka
  • sumac
  • some cherry tomatoes
  • some mint leaves

Put all ingredients into a shaker and crush the tomatoes and mint leaves. Shake with ice. Double strain into a cup. Serve with crisp bread on the side.

This post is part of the World of Films and Cocktails series. Explore the map.

WFC Singapore: Forever Fever

I had gotten the French version of the DVD. Ooops! But Amazon Video to the rescue. The picture was kinda washed out, though. Compare:

That’s from the Amazon Video version.

That’s from the DVD. The darks are really dark on the DVD, and the colours pop, while the Amazon version is pale and bland.

Why isn’t the future better than it is?

Anyway! The film!

The actors leave no scenery unchewed, but that’s quite appropriate for this disco comedy.

It’s a very likeable film, touching and consistently amusing. I didn’t laugh out loud, though.

That’s the Way I Like It. Glen Goei. 1998. Singapore.

The Raffles Hotel Original Singapore Gin Sling Cocktail

  • 1 part benedictine
  • 1 part Cointreau
  • 2 parts cherry heering
  • 6 parts gin
  • 16 parts pineapple juice
  • 2 parts lime juice
  • 1 part grenadine
  • a dash of bitters

Shake with ice and strain into an ice-filled glass.

This post is part of the World of Films and Cocktails series. Explore the map.

WFC Jamaica: Shottas

This is kinda fresh. It’s low budget but doesn’t really look it. It has a kind of charming swagger to it, both in the acting and the editing. It’s a child-like wish fulfilment fantasy. Only with guns and drugs.

Very silly.

Shottas. Cess Silvera. 2002. Jamaica.

Body Heat

  • 1 part lemon juice
  • 3 parts orange juice
  • 3 parts pineapple juice
  • 3 parts Malibu coconut rum
  • 3 parts banana liqueur
  • a dash of grenadine syrup

Run all the ingredients (except the Grenadine) through a blender with ice. Pour into a highball glass and add the grenadine.

This post is part of the World of Films and Cocktails series. Explore the map.

WFC Kazakhstan: Tulpan

Ah. Back on DVD again, so the video quality is, like, better. Than Amazon Video.

This is a very wind-blown, distracted film. Things seem to proceed sideways.

It’s funny, but it’s just so slow. Sooo slow. And I love slow films.

It has an abundance of charm. Love the actors and the steppe.

Those poor sheep. Birthin’ sheep babbies ain’t easy.

Tulpan. Sergei Dvortsevoy. 2008. Kazakhstan.

The Drink of Gods

  • 1 part cream
  • 1 part Amaretto
  • 1 part white rum
  • dash of caramel srup

Shake with ice and strain into an ice-filled glass.

This post is part of the World of Films and Cocktails series. Explore the map.