Fauna

The other day I noticed some teensy bugs on the balcony.  I first thought they were ants or something, but looking at them more closely, I guess not?

IMG_5929 They’re so small that it’s difficult to get them in focus…

Kill them with fire?

I’ll buy some more poison tomorrow, I think.

My New Horticulture Blog

The seeds I planted a couple of weeks ago are growing pretty well. Probably because I’ve almost never forgotten to water them. It’s an achievement!

But it’s very windy on my balcony, so I thought it might make sense to shield the plants a bit from the incessant wind. I bought some plexiglas (i.e. plastic) sheets, drilled some holes in them (with a wood drill bit — I was afraid the plexiglas might shatter (it’s quite brittle), but it worked fine), and tied them up with some fishing line:

IMG_5498Looks almost invisible, eh? But they’ll probably grow gross as time passes. We’ll see.

Anyway, I think this is the reason for the windiness:

IMG_5499I’m on the edge of a hill, sort of, so even if there’s the slightest air movement in the hollow down there, I get a blast of wind.

Or something.

My New Horticultural Blog

I decided that I should grow my own food, so I planted some radishes and peas and carrots and stuff.

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I need to start thinning out in a couple of days…

In other horticultural news, everything’s coming up roses:

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After the previous post, a kind reader identified the bugs as aphids, and I went out and got some aphid-killing poisonous poison that I sprayed onto the roses.  All the bugs disappeared within a couple of days, and then the roses started flowering.

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Poison: It Kills

I moved the veggies to the other balcony, though.  I mean, like, poison.

My New Horticultural Blog

No horrors today.  I bought some poison to spray over the rose bushes, which should take care of the critters living on them.  Or it’ll give them resistance and they’ll kill me in my sleep.

But I bought a Sansevieria Victoria.  There are a lot of weird sansevierias, and this is one of them.

IMG_5369It’s just one leaf!

Unless the garden centre sold me a fake.  The way you usually propagate sansevierias is by cutting off one leaf and sticking it in soil, and new, smaller plants will sprout.  And then you get rid of the original leaf.

But that’s not the case here.  It’s got a very well-developed root system:

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So plantey.

My New Horticultural Blog

Due to the exceptionally warm winter, or exceptionally studly plants, the roses on my balcony survived.  But one of the bushes looks kinda…  odd…

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See?  There’s a white powder thing going on, and there seems to be a lot of spider web action going on, too.  But mainly around the buds.

So is this a disease of some kind?  Or is it environmental?  They’ve been renovating the neighbouring house the last few weeks, and there’ a lot of white dust flowing around everywhere.

But I do think it looks kinda diseased.

Should I get rid of the roses?  I had kinda assumed that they would die during the winter, so I would plant vegetables there this summer…

Mmm.  Peas.

IT”S ALIVE!!1!ONE?!

As I’m sure you all remember, in the last terrifying chapter of this story, I found that the white fluff had spread to another room.

During the Xmas holidays, I visited my mother.  She’s brilliant with all kinds of plants and stuff, so I showed her the pictures of the aloe armageddon.  She said: “Are you sure that’s a fungus?  It might be some kind of insect.”  I said “Sure I’m sure!  Nothing moved!  I didn’t see anything insectey.  Just the fluff!  Mooooomm!!!”

Guess what.

ImageIt’s spread to another aloe.

And guess what.

IMG_5062See those little green things?  I think those are some kind of insect.

Are there any apartments for sale nearby that I can move to?  Hm?  Hm?

UNCLEAN!!!