Oh, Brando

I bought some USB3->SATA adapters from Brando.  They came with US->Euro plug adapters.  (Yes, the adapters had adapters with adapters.  Geez.)

See if you can spot the problem.

In addition, the speed I get when ripping CDs via these adapters is, as they say, teh sux.

Oh, well.  It’s not as if I actually expected something bought from Brando to work, but it was worth a shot.

Sennheiser HDR 180

Headphones cradled on the charging cradle

Most hardware seems to have been created in a “will this do?” mind set.  They have a bit of technology, and they have some economic restraints, and then they rush it to market.  It makes perfect sense, and I can’t envision that it’ll ever change, but it’s somewhat depressing.

The hardware in question this week are the Sennheiser HDR 180 wireless headphones.  They use Klear wireless technology, and they sound really good.  There are no drop-outs, there is no buzzing — they just work, even if I walk to the far side of the apartment.  They’re, technically speaking, what you would call “ace”.

Cradle on/off button

But then there’s the User Experience details.

The headphones usually rest on the charger thingie you see up there.  It’s nice.  So when I start watching something on the “TV” and I want to use the headphones, I pick up the headphones and put them on my head?

Nope.

I pick up the headphones.  Then I hit the “on” button on the base station.  Then I hit the “on” button on the headphones themselves.  Then I put them on my head.

Headphone UX

Because, I mean, why would you assume that just because I’m picking them off the charging station, I want to use them?  Perhaps I want to do something completely different.  Perhaps I picked them off the charging station to hang them out to dry on the balcony?  Or perhaps I wanted to dance around with them, fondling them inappropriately?  I mean, that’s so much more likely than wanting to use them.

This is why I hate all hardware.  Hardware never works the way it should.

And I didn’t even want to go into the UX of the headphones themselves.  You see those five buttons on the headphones?  Yes, there’s volume up, on/off, and volume down buttons.  Fine.  But then, next to them, there’s two balance buttons.  So when I have the headphones on my head, which is usually where they are when I’m using them, I have to feel around, tentatively, for the volume buttons, because once you hit the balance buttons, you’ll never get the right balance back again.  There’s no “return the balance to the, er, balanced position” button. It’s like FAIL!!!1! And who the fuck wants to change the balance, anyway?

Oh, by Emacs.  I hate hardware.

Synology DS409 RAID is Crap

Do you see that thing over there?  The Synology Disk Station DS409?  It’s crap.

It’s not the usual hardware RAID problems that make it so crappy. 

Yes, it’s slow.  Painfully slow. 

Yes, it has a weird Linux kernel that, somehow, manages to do put all NFS clients into

df: `/mirror’: Permission denied

if you change any export permissions.  Any.  Not even on the volume in question. Or

df: `/mirror’: Stale file handle

if you reboot it.  How have they even managed to do that?

No, it’s not that.

It’s that if one of the disks break (as they are wont to do, which is why we have the “R” and “I” in “RAID”), which usually happens at 2am, the thing starts beeping.

Loudly.

Beep.  Beep.  Beep.

And there’s no way to turn the beeping off.  Other than switching the entire thing off.  So you have a redundant disk system, but if one of the disks break, it starts beeping so loud that it’ll wake all the neighbours, so you just have to switch it off until you can find a new disk to replace the old one.

So it’s redundant, but you can’t use it.  Ingenious.

The only thing I can recommend about the Synology DS409 is that it’s less unstable than any of the other commodity hardware RAID devices I’ve used.  Which means that as soon as 4TB disks become available, I’m going to just make a two disk soft RAID device and escape the horrible clutches of hardware RAID makers.

(I should make this blog into an electronic consumer review site, shouldn’t I?)